Balancing Process and Product in Creative Art Activities

Toddler painting with squeeze bottle

Well-planned art experiences are a valuable part of the child care curriculum. Early childhood art activities need to balance process and product. Process is doing, product is the result. Young children are process-oriented. For infants and toddlers, the joy of art is in the doing and making. They usually want lots of finger paint, really squish it around, and then pay no attention to what happens to their picture afterward.

Preschoolers love to experiment with color and design. They do …

Avoid Activities Masquerading as Creative Art in Child Care Settings

Crayons and coloring sheet

Creative art is an important part of the child care curriculum because it allows children to practice self-expression, fine motor skills, thinking and many other skills. Unfortunately, many activities that look like creative art do not actually encourage creativity. These activities are sometimes used in art programs and may help develop fine muscle control or eye-hand coordination, but they don’t provide artistic and creative opportunities.

It’s important to avoid activities masquerading as creative art. Activities that masquerade as creative share …

Planning Creative Art Activities for Multi-age Groups

Child's hands painting a ball of paper

Many child care providers work with mixed-age groups that include children of many different ages. Planning your child care curriculum to include creative art activities that are appropriate (and safe) for infants through school-agers can be challenging. Here are some tips for child care providers to choose creative art activities for multi-age groups.

  • Choose materials that appeal to different ages. Activities such as painting, drawing, and working with play dough are art activities that children of all ages can enjoy.